X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation

X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation
X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation
X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation
X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation
X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation
X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation
X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation
X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation
X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation
X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation
X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation
X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation

X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation

Artifacts, Antiques & Fine Collectibles. Neolithic Chinese Ceremonial Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Scepter/Mace. Sons & Grandson's Ritual Offerings for an Ancient Chinese Dragon King.

A Chartreuse 10 Jade Cylinder with Seated Humanoid/God. Painted Black Pictographs of a Dragon, Ritual Wine, & Sacrificed Animals. Provided with a Partial English Translation of the Inscription. 7,000 BCE-5,000 BCE.

On Behalf of Their Departed Dragon King and Noble Father. His Sons & Grandsons Offer the Following Sacrifices.

To the Sun God Di and to His Ancestors During this Anniversary. Ritual Wine, Raw Meat of Several Sacrificed Animals, and this Jade Scepter/Mace.

As Proof of His Royal Linage and to Ward Off Evil Spirits. May these Sacrifices Allow His Soul to Safely Journey to Eternal Life. With His Dragon Father & All His Ancestors in Heaven (T'ien).

Expanded English Translated by WDH, Ancient Civilizations. Houghton, the President of ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS. A State of Washington Licensed Business. Assumes all responsibility for the information contained in this description and for the English translation and transcription of the ancient Chinese graphic characters.

Furthermore, I prohibit the further dissemination of this information in any written, video, or electronic format without my expressed, written approval. Chinese Neolithic Ritual Jade Scepter/Mace with Black Painted Pictographs.

Material: Chartreuse Nephrite Jade Cylinder. Neolithic or early Hongshan Culture.

Museum quality with no repairs or restorations. This ancient temple or tomb mace is made of exceedingly rare chartreuse nephrite jade with black inclusions and painted pictographs. Some of the calcium and mineral deposits have been professionally removed to show the stunning beauty of this ancient treasure.

Please see macro photos for details. It is in my personal collection for some time and this is the first time it is being offered for sale in the United States. The style and material of this mace is similar to an example in the National Palace Museum, Taipei, Taiwan that dates to 7,000 BC. Items offered for sale by Ancient Civilizations are unconditionally guaranteed authentic. They were legally imported to the United States years ago and are legal to sell and own under U.

Statute Title 19, Chapter 14, Code 2611, Convention on Cultural Property. This Neolithic Chinese Jade Ceremonial Humanoid/Sun God 10 Scepter was made during China's Neolithic Culture as a. Scepter or mace for the royal leaders in ancient China approximately 7,000 to 9,000-years-ago.

It weighs 3.1 lbs. And is made from stunning, chartreuse nephrite jade.

Based upon the pictographs contained on the jade mace, I believe it would have been part of a temple offering made at a temple by the sons and grandsons for their father/grandfather, who was a noble king-and therefore was worshiped as a God and thought to be a Son of the Dragon King, who ruled all beings on Earth. Such ceremonies were held on a regular basis after a royal's death, usually weekly for a month, then at 60 and 90 days, and lastly at the yearly anniversary of the death.

This royal scepter or mace would have been attached to a long bamboo or wooden pole by a cord passed through the four holes at the top of the scepter and carried to the above-ground temple in a royal procession. The two holes under the arms to the seated Sun God are classified as "conical bore holes" while the holes behind the Sun God's neck are ox-nose holes. All four holes are period correct, with the correct lapidary signatures and micro-crystalline, white jade crystals on the inside walls of the holes.

There is at least one, very small, painted pictograph that measures about only 3mm tall of a Son, with his arms raised to the Heavens (Tien), making an offering to the gods on behalf of his royal father to accept him into eternal life in Heaven. In ancient times, holes were thought to be a portal to the gods and ancestors in Heaven and the prayers of those still living could be transported to Heaven. But these messages were only meant for the gods and ancestors, as human eyes were not worthy to see them-therefore, they were made very small. The Supreme Sun/Heaven God Di is sitting in judgement on the top of the ritual mace is separated from the bottom half by three-parallel-lines that are cut deeply into the jade and circle the entire mace. This is the ancient character " San " that means Heaven, Earth, and Man. This is a common character found on ritual jade artifacts found in tombs and in temples for the royal family or for the upper class in ancient China. ENGLISH TRANSLATION OF THE INSCRIPTION. Houghton, the President of ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS, a State of Washington Licensed Business, assumes all responsibility for the information contained in this description and for the English translation and transcription of the ancient Chinese graphic characters.

Any translation errors are unintentional and strictly mine. This jade royal scepter has several pictographs that are painted, pecked, and incised onto it. But I believe the images I can translate tell a story that has been lost for millennia.

As previously noted, there is at least one, very small, painted pictograph that measures about only 3mm tall of a Son, with his arms raised to the Heavens (Tien), making an offering to the gods on behalf of his royal father to accept him into eternal life in Heaven. But perhaps the most stunning aspect of this mace/scepter are the six sets of pictographs that were painted onto the lower half of the mace in black pigments. Because they used mineral paints, the black paint bonded to the jade and although faded and blurry, is still translatable. These pictograph characters are some of the earliest written words and inscription ever used in ancient China or indeed the world. The largest pictographic image is that of a Dragon that stretches completely around the lower half of the cylinder-shaped mace.

On his back, are two figures that perhaps represent the Soul of the departed father who is riding the Dragon to immortality in Heaven. Chinese kings and emperors literally thought they were the real dragons and Sons of Heaven. Thus, the beds they slept on are called "dragon beds;" the throne, a "dragon seat;" and the emperor's ceremonial dresses are known as dragon robes. Directly above the Dragon, is a 46mm long figure that may represent a carp dragon as it swims with the Soul of the departed to Heaven.

Just above that image, is a grouping of six, compound characters that flow down from the Sun God Di's bent left arm. The figure right below the suspension hole is that of a jade axe blade secured to a long handle. This represents the Son sacrificing an animal during the ceremony. Just below the axe, is a tiny, incised imaged that is perhaps one of the Sons who has used the axe to kill a beast. Next is the 22mm vertical image that represents a skinned animal on a stake that was sacrificed.

At the lower base of the vertical stake, the Son who has slain the beast is pictured. The ancients would offer both raw and cooked meat to the ancestors and gods in this way.

Next is the image of a round, flared, pottery vessel that would have held ritual wine. The wine was not consumed, but would be poured on grass bundles on the ground by a priest and then the grass burned so their prayers could ascend into the sky and to the Heavens. The next set contains two images: another Son with a raised axe in his right hand and the animal to be sacrificed. And finally there is set of figures within a short, curved, black, horizontal line with two very small figures in red (likely from the cinnabar that was often used). One is a tiny "I" that is the character for "King" and the other directly above it is that of a Heaven Bird, which was thought to carry prayers and the Soul of the departed to Heaven.

On Behalf of Their Departed Dragon King & Noble Father. May these Sacrifices Allow His Soul to Safely Journey to. Eternal Life with His Dragon Father Di & All His Ancestors in Heaven (T'ien). In China, jade has been a material of the highest value since ancient times, prized for its beauty and magical properties. Translucent yet tough, jade was worked into ornaments, ceremonial weapons and ritual objects by Chinese craftspeople. At least 8,000 years ago, Neolithic China ancestors gradually came to know the beauty of jade through the process of grinding stone tools. Following this discovery, they dissected the uncut pieces of jade, carved the jade into objects and created a unique jade art.

The ancient Chinese people believed that jade was elegant and graceful, and condensed the spirit of heaven and earth. Therefore, jade not only had aesthetic value but also acquired both sacred and human qualities.

In the pre-Qin period (before 221 BC) that this scepter was made, jade was used to express our ancestors' devout religious feelings, symbolize wealth and power and serve as the embodiment of etiquette and moral sentiment. After the Qin and Han dynasties (after AD 220), jade gradually lost its sacred aura and became a secular treasure for the masses. It was increasingly used in ordinary life, carrying people's good wishes for health, happiness and good fortune. Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC.

Chinese Jades: The Youngman Collection. Radiant Stones: Archaic Chinese Jades. Museum of Chinese History, Beijing, China. National Palace Museum, Taipei, Taiwan. Smithsonian Museum, Sackler & Freer Gallery, WDC.

Consolidating Editor, Roger Keverne, pg. A Dragon can be unseen or visible, minute or huge. However, always it is great. In ancient China, nobody had any doubt about the existence of dragons.

People showed great respect for any depictions of dragons -- in paintings, carvings, and writings. As a result, the dragon became the symbol of the Chinese nation. All people in China, including the emperor, prostrated themselves before the image of a dragon with reverence and awe. As a result, this fictional creature became the spiritual sustenance for the nation first as the totem of a tribe and then as the symbol of the nation. Chinese emperors literally thought they were the real dragons and Sons of Heaven.

The Hongshan Culture The Hongshan were temple builders and city builders who created some of the earliest nephrite jade carvings. Their sophisticated Jade carving techniques employed technologies that exceeded simple explanations. It has recently been discovered that the Hongshan possessed the knowledge of metallurgy and employed the use of copper and iron from meteorites as tools to work their jade masterpieces. Many of the Hongshan Jade artifacts are well persevered because the Hongshan culture utilized slab burial tombs and because of the dry arid climate of Inner Mongolia.

As many of you know, Nephrite jade, also known as "soft jade" or "ancient Jade" in China, was used from China's early Neolithic cultures in 8,000 BC to 1800 AD for carving all types of ritual and utilitarian items. Nephrite, which is somewhat "softer" than the jadeite used by Neolithic Japanese and European cultures, was easier to cut, carve, polish, and drill than jadeite. So, the ancient Chinese found that Nephrite Jade could be worked by using quartz or garnet sand, polished with bamboo or jade dust, and even drilled with wood drills that used a slurry made of jade dust and water as the abrasive. Jade was highly prized by these early civilizations in China, and it was thought to have positive energy to drive away evil spirits and bring good luck and fortune to all who wore a piece on their person--in life and in death.

Jade was also believed to be a portal or messenger that could carry prayers to Heaven and send messages to those on Earth from departed ancestors and Gods in Heaven. Based on artifact evidence and 30 years of study that the Hongshan employed advanced jade shaping and carving tools that may have been made from meteorite iron or even diamonds.

One fascinating study is the evidence of high content iron found in black jades used for ritual objects by the early Hongshan. Many of these artifacts are magnetic and express the possibility that the Hongshan were aware of magnetic earth forces. During China's Neolithic Period, Hongshan Jade ritual and tomb objects were created for a period of more than 2,000 years. Hongshan jades have been discovered in large quantities with over 52 different types of Jade objects in various shapes and forms. Jade (called the "Stone of Heaven" by the Chinese) is considered immortal and priceless.

Indeed, the inscription and dedication found written on this amulet has lasted over 5,000 years! Please see below for my translation of some of the pictographs and characters contained on this priceless jade artifact. I've looked under 10x-20x magnification under both natural and Black Light and I can find no signs of any modern tool work or repairs. The hand tool marks left in the jade by the master stone artist who carved, shaped, and engraved this work of art appear to be consistent with those marks of other ancient jades I have examined.

Each object I sell is professionally researched, translated if I can... (smile), and compared with similar objects in the collections of the finest museums in the world.

When in doubt, I have worked with dozens of subject matter experts to determine the condition and authenticity of numerous antiquities and antiques. Please examine the macro photos taken indoors carefully, as they are part of the description. This item is in the category "Antiques\Asian Antiques\China\Amulets". The seller is "houghton-usa" and is located in this country: US.

This item can be shipped to United States, Germany, Japan, Canada, United Kingdom, France, Australia.


X-RARE Ancient Chinese Jade Heaven/Sun God Royal Dragon Scepter withTranslation